In The Press We're killing it!

  • Ian Froeb's Top 10 Restaurants of 2016

    ‘This late 2015 addition to St. Louis’ food-truck fleet leaps to the head of my “I hope they open a brick-and-mortar location!” list.’ Ian Froeb ‘Top 10 Restaurants of 2016’
  • Sauce Magazine

    “Hand-cut russet potatoes are brined and double-fried for what just might be the best order of french fries in St. Louis.” (Sauce Magazine – Best New Food Trucks 2016)
  • St. Louis Magazine A List

    “Chef-owned and operated Frankly Sausages is driving the dog to new heights.” (St. Louis Magazine A List 2016 Best New Food Truck)
  • Eater Top 10 Places to Try

    For something fast and casual, but no less delicious, track down Frankly Sausages food truck. All the sausages are made by hand, from scratch. You can opt for familiar flavors, like a local all-beef frank with coarse grain mustard, or get a little inventive. Try the chile verde with avocado and tomatillo relish, queso fresco, cilantro, and lime.
  • St. Louis Post Dispatch "Highly Recommended"

    “The sausages from Frankly Artisan Sausages hit the tube-meat trifecta — snappy, juicy, flavorful…” Ian Froeb ‘Highly Recommended’ Review (St. Louis Post Dispatch)
  • Show Me St. Louis

    “Absolutely, hands down the best. They are phenomenal.” Customer on Show Me St. Louis’ feature video.
  • Feast Magazine: Must Try Food Trucks #3

    Frankly Sausages serves a simple, yet flawlessly executed menu. True to it’s name, the truck specializes in handmade, fresh artisan sausages.
  • St. Louis Public Radio: Sound Bites

    On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, Bill and Jamie Cawthon, the proprietors of one of Sauce Magazine’s top picks, Frankly Sausages, joined contributor Steve Potter to discuss their food truck, what the scene is like in St. Louis and how to make it in the food truck business here.
  • Olio City Guide

    We know what you’re thinking: a sausage shop? Oh, it’s so much more, friend. Chef Bill Cawthon is using his fine dining training to make not only some of the best sausages in town–ranging from chicken to alligator–but also approachable, delicious small plates. And CHEESE FRIES with hot, gooey raclette dripped on to order.
  • STL Today

    Frankly Sausages, a popular food truck,is opening a brick-and-mortar restaurant tonight. Dana Dean is live at the new spot…Frankly on Cherokee.
  • Whiskey and Soba

    Let’s cut to the chase: these are the best fish and chips I’ve had in St. Louis, combined with their famous hand cut fries, which are also probably the best in St. Louis.
  • Sauce Magazine: Hit List

    Frankly Sausages food truck fans already know: This place has the best fries. The fact that these brined, double-fried, exquisitely crisp and tender fries are now available all the time in a brick-and-mortar – and on the bar-hopping mecca Cherokee Street, no less – might be a problem for us.
  • Feast Magazine

    New items include a chicken-liver crostino with balsamic and chives as well as a butternut squash salad with arugula, ricotta, hazelnuts and burnt honey. Hand-cut fries with hot imported Swiss raclette cheese – a food-truck favorite – will also be on offer.
  • Sauce Magazine: First Look

    Large menu boards are divided into classic sausages like German, Polish and beer bratwursts, and more nontraditional options like a Thanksgiving-inspired turkey and an alligator sausage. A board of rotating sharable plates feature salads and off-cuts dishes like chicken liver crostini. F
  • Riverfront Times

    Husband-and-wife team Bill and Jamie Cawthon, who co-own the food truck Frankly Sausages, say they’ll open their brick-and-mortar location in October, providing a permanent home for the gourmet sausages that St. Louisans have come to know and love in their year and a half of operation.
  • Sauce Magazine: Hit List

    Frankly Sausages food truck fans already know: This place has the best fries. The fact that these brined, double-fried, exquisitely crisp and tender fries are now available all the time in a brick-and-mortar – and on the bar-hopping mecca Cherokee Street, no less – might be a problem for us.